#atozchallenge: Capitalism has Failed

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It is the love of money that is the root of all evil, not money in and of itself. Hoarding it, refusing to spend it, refusing to pay taxes on it so that it may help others, is the love of it.

The re-distribution of wealth are the four most hated words in any crony capitalist society. ‘We earned it!’ cry the CEOs of Fortune-500 companies who have placed so little value on their workers. ‘If you weren’t so lazy you could be here too!’

The fact of the matter is the value placed on owning something is much higher than working for it. Therefore, a CEO obviously will make more than a shop assistant because we believe that having the company means more than working for it. And this model follows everywhere: the principal of a school makes more money for running the school/being ‘the face’ than a teacher does in the classroom.

And so, of course, money flows upwards. Those at the very, very bottom are left fighting for what is left over, and even those who do not place much value on money say ‘just work smarter, not harder and you can get to the top’.

Capitalism even at its purest is a terrible idea for any diverse society made up of people with different needs, wants and talents. Capitalism at its worst postulates that if you do not or cannot supply capital, you do not deserve to live. And in 21st century Western society, we see it happening: people who do not have capital die from a lack of it.

American and European societies are held at the echelon of what a ‘developed’ nation should look like. What is it, exactly? Mal-nourished children who are struggling in class because they’re hungry? Homeless veterans with no place to turn to receive aid for their PTSD? If we live in the greatest society, what then, is the worst? – SDM

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If you’d like to read my other posts in this year’s A to Z challenge, check them out here.

Photo by Joel Santana

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11 Comments

  1. I have come to realise that even though in France not everything is perfect, it is a country in which much redistribution happens. The healthcare is very good, and 60-70% of it is covered by the state, well everyone pays into a big pot, the remaining percent are private healthcare, except if you have a very low income, or a pregnant or have a terrible illness, in that case the state does cover that too. I am freelance, had just started and received a very good maternity cover when I had my daughter (50€ or so per day for 3 months).
    There is a lot of help for the paying of rent, for childcare and there are child benefits (ok you need at least two for those to go beyond the 3rd birthday of the child). I recently heard that 30% of all income in France is in form of social redistribution. As we only have one child (she’s still under three), and receive no more help for our rent, the money we get for our daughter until her third birthday covers less than 10% of our income.
    When people do complain about how the little people are neglected, don’t receive enough money, I can only shake my head and say, look at the US, healthcare is not free over there! Look at Switzerland, private healthcare is such a big part of the monthly budget! Here the state is there to help you out, healthcare, sick leave, unemployment benefits, low income benefits, help with rent, childcare, child benefits etc.
    Oh my, my comment does try to explain an entire system. But then again I think that proposing “help with french paperwork” could be a great service to propose to foreigners…

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Pingback: #atozchallenge: The A to Zed Reveal! – A Political World Tour

  3. Visiting during these early days of the #Challenge. I don’t agree with anything you have written, but do I ever appreciate a blog that is easy to read and navigate, not all cluttered up with “stuff.” I congratulate you on the hard work it takes to participate. If you have time, an interest in historic hotels and inns, come visit me. In your world travels I know you have found gems.

    Liked by 1 person

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