#weekendcoffeeshare: A Weekend of Politics

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I do not actually drink coffee. So, were we having a cup of coffee, I would opt for a nice cup of tea. Today’s cup of tea is actually a cup of Fortnum & Mason’s Queen Anne blend of Ceylon and Assam. (I am a bit of a tea person.) It is a bright and sunny but impressively cold day for a southern state (3°C).

Currently, I am curled up on my sofa listening to my enormous backlog of podcasts. I am a big fan of podcasts and I listen to a wide range of them. My favourite political one, other than the BBC’s The Week in Westminster is The Best of the LeftI’ve been listening to them for a while. I’m on episode #985, A conservative policy showcase (Flint’s poisoned water). Obviously, I can only say that this sort of thing is infuriating, and were we having our caffeinated beverages, we’d probably spend a lot of time talking about it. My favourite bit about this podcast is that they have a segment called Activisim, where they tell you about petitions, awareness campaigns and other proposals to help once you’ve been informed and angered.

If we were in France and having coffee, it would be an espresso, and I would be overjoyed (I do love France). I would be gushing about my new favourite news magazine, Les Jours. It is a subscription-based, completely independent and online news source created by a team from Libé, a left-wing newspaper which I also love. I’ve just finished reading a longform article about the collège system in France. Collège is French for middle-school, and it was an amazing look at it. I’m current reading a first-person account about the days after the 13 November attacks. I have found a new love. I would be telling you to subscribe!

Later, I will probably binge-watch The Daily Show with Trevor Noah. I was a huge fan of the show with Jon Stewart, and I love Noah’s very different look at our political system. I also think he’s very cute, superficially. So were we having coffee, I’d probably be repeating a joke poorly or telling you about something I learnt from the show.

And finally tonight, the Republican debate on CBS. Were we having coffee, you would probably ask why I would torture myself. I would tell you that I am really funny on Twitter and that the Republican debates are a source of much horrified amusement.

So, let’s drink on, friends. – SDM

NB: Read all the other Weekend Coffee Share posts for this weekend here.

Photo by Greg (Vanderdecken)

What I’m reading this week: 29 January 2016

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I try to read articles from all around the world. Admittedly, I usually browse them between classes or at lunch. I get a lot of my news from National Public Radio; I try to avoid watching television for news. Yes, I read mostly left-wing publications. So without further ado, what I’m reading/perusing this week around. I hope to make this a weekly thing, if I can remember. Definitely fort-nightly, at least.

How Iowa Hijacked Our Democracy by Jeff Greenfield : I never knew why we picked Iowa of all places to kick off the grand democratic game of the US presidential election. I hadn’t realised that it’s a fairly young institution (1972). Iowa isn’t a great representative state, although it is an honest place, seemingly. There’s also an alarmingly low turnout rate, although there’s an alarmingly low turn out rate in the US elections, generally.

After reading such a negative look at Iowa, I thought, well what can we do, really? Thankfully, I found some ideas in a handy list form from Danielle Kurtzleben at NPR: No Way To Pick A President? Here Are 6 Other Ways To Do It. There were some really good ideas; my favourite was the rotating regional primary, wherein regions of states would vote together.

Continuing on my American politics read, I am a new subscriber to The New Yorker. When I lived in London, a friend would give me her old copies and I’d read them on the Tube during my commute. I was tired of getting that reminder that I had read half my monthly allotment so I just went in for an educator’s subscription. Hot tip: if you are a school teacher, just call The New Yorker direct at 1.800.825.2510 and you’ll get the discount!

I read two articles from The New Yorker, one about Bernie Sanders and one about Flint, Michigan. I really do like Bernie Sanders over Hilary Clinton, but it’s way too early for me to make that heavy of a decision! The article, Bernie Sanders and the Realists by John Cassidy was a very pithy look at Sanders’s actual chances, and how idealism works in such a cynical environment as the US political system.

And then I read The Contempt That Poisoned Flint’s Water by Amy Davidson and just got angry. How is this sort of blatant and utter corruption even still a thing in America? I should be less naive, I know, but it was disheartening nonetheless. Sometimes, I feel as though America is still a developing nation sometimes, no matter how sophisticated we pretend to be.

Onto world news, then. From Europe, I read Der Spiegel from Germany; The Guardian from the UK (along with the BBC and The Independent, though I don’t like the latter that much); Le MondeLe Figaro, and Le Libération from France and a few newspapers from Sweden and Spain when they pop up on my Twitter feed. I also read Al-Jazeera English when I remember I have the app!

In Der Spiegel, an article about the new refugee identity cards caught my eye; it was an article about how this new identity card would create a faster and more secure way of identifying asylum seekers and getting the help they need. [Article’s title: ‘Asylpolitik: Bundesrat billigt Flüchtlingsausweis’]

From The Guardian’s Simon Parkin, an article about Daesh and its mastery of pop culture: ‘ How Isis hijacked pop culture, from Hollywood to video games‘. It was a fascinating (and long!) read about how Daesh and many other organisations use pop culture in order to entice, indoctrinate and recruit new members.

Le Monde had an article about the proposed changes to Paris’s neighbourhoods, called arrondisements. Redistricting isn’t a super sexy thing, I know, but changing a century’s old system for voting purposes (seriously!) is something that is strikingly similar to American gerrymandering. Paris’s mayor, Anne Hidalgo, says that putting together the first four arrondisements would create a larger, more fair voting bloc. To what end, I have no idea, as I am not a Parisienne, but it will be interesting to watch. [The article: ‘Tout comprendre aux vingt arrondissements de Paris’]

And finally, from Le Libération, I read an article by Jean-Manuel Escarnot about two brothers from Toulouse, former Catholics, who have become rappers/singers for Daesh; it’s entitled Les frères Clain, rappeurs catholiques devenus voix de l’Etat islamique. Like The Guardian article above, it shows how sophisticated Daesh is in reaching its audience, using voices from around the world to carry its message to the most ears possible. There is also a fifteen minute documentary about the brothers at Arte Radio that you can listen to here (it is in French).

Until next time. – SDM

Picture by Angelo DeSantis from Berkeley, US